Heart Attack Statistics & Risk Factors

See the facts and take action

Taking proactive steps today to live a healthier lifestyle can reduce the risk of another heart attack tomorrow. The more you understand what can put you at risk, the better you can work to manage those risks and prevent a future heart attack.

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335,000
SURVIVORS

Every year, about 335,000 survivors have another heart attack.

Cardiac Rehab Rate
47%
REDUCED WITH CARDIAC REHAB

Cardiac rehab was found to help reduce the chances of a repeat heart attack by 47%.

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1 IN 4

About 1 out of 4 heart attacks is believed to be directly related to smoking.

EVERY
2.6
MINUTES

Every 2.6 minutes, a survivor has another heart attack.

 

Sticking to a treatment plan is crucial for every survivor’s recovery. If you’ve had a heart attack, discover a possible treatment option to discuss with your doctor.

 

Demographics

When it comes to heart attacks, there are certain factors that you can’t always control, like your family’s medical history, race, age, gender, and ethnic heritage. Factors like these play a huge role in determining your risk of a heart attack. These facts may help you better understand your relationship with heart attack risk.

African Americans
African Americans

African Americans are susceptible to genetic differences that can cause higher blood pressure compared to Caucasian Americans, which may put them at a higher risk of a heart attack.

Mexican Americans, native Hawaiians, and some Asian-Americans
Mexican Americans, native Hawaiians, and some Asian-Americans

Mexican Americans, native Hawaiians, and some Asian-Americans have higher rates of diabetes and high blood pressure which may increase the risk for heart attacks.

Risk of Heart Attack
Risk of Heart Attack

Men are at a greater risk of a heart attack than women are, and have heart attacks earlier in life.

Average age of first heart attack
Average age of first heart attack

Average age of first heart attack is 64.7 years for men and 72.2 years for women.

 

Heart attack symptoms in men vs. women

Chest pain is the most common symptom of a heart attack for both men and women. However, women may experience less obvious warning signs than men that leave them vulnerable. Learn the differences in signs so you know what to look for.

Tap men or women below to see the symptoms

 

MEN

WOMEN

 

Nausea or vomiting

Nausea or Vomiting Icon
Nausea or Vomiting Icon

Jaw, neck, or back pain

Back Pain Icon
Back Pain Icon

Squeezing chest pressure or pain

Chest Pain Icon
Chest Pain Icon

Shortness of breath

Shortness of Breath Icon
Shortness of Breath Icon
Nausea or Vomiting Icon
Nausea or Vomiting Icon

Nausea or vomiting

Back Pain Icon
Back Pain Icon

Jaw, neck, or upper back pain

Chest Pain Icon
Chest Pain Icon

Chest pain, but not always

Pain or Pressure in the Lower Chest or Upper Abdomen
Pain or Pressure in the Lower Chest or Upper Abdomen

Pain or pressure in the lower chest or upper abdomen

Shortness of Breath Icon
Shortness of Breath Icon

Shortness of breath

Fainting or Sudden Dizziness Icon
Fainting or Sudden Dizziness Icon

Fainting

Indigestion Icon
Indigestion Icon

Indigestion

Extreme Tiredness Icon
Extreme Tiredness Icon

Extreme tiredness

Nausea or vomiting

Jaw, neck, or back pain

Squeezing chest pressure or pain

Shortness of breath

Nausea or vomiting

Jaw, neck or upper back pain

Chest pain, but not always

Pain or pressure in the lower chest or upper abdomen

Shortness of breath

Fainting

Indigestion

Extreme tiredness

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